WHO OWNS THE “ZIKA” VIRUS?

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WHO OWNS THE “ZIKA” VIRUS?

Answer:  Rockefeller! Foundation:   Zika virus, like HPV is a sexually transmitted virus.  It was patented via the blood from “experimental” forest sentinel rhesus monkey, Uganda 1947

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VLA Comment:  Some thoughts….Did the experimenting with Rhesus monkey and vaccines cause the HPV virus, the Cancer epidemic from the Polio vaccine made from the host of monkey’s carrying the retrovirus SV 40?

HIV/AIDS and Rhesus Macaques

The HIV virus is also found naturally in the Rhesus Macaques.  Could HIV, as well as Zika as well as the Simian 40 virus (retro virus) found in the Polio vaccine come from pharma’s experiments in Africa using the rhesus Macques as hosts?  See animation for retro viruses

Four monkeys were already naturally infected with E. bieneusi (also genotype D)

Microsporidia are long-known parasitic organisms of almost every animal group, including invertebrates and vertebrates. Microsporidia emerged as important opportunistic pathogens in humans when AIDS became pandemic and, more recently, have also increasingly been detected in otherwise immunocompromised patients, including organ transplant recipients, and in immunocompetent persons with corneal infection or diarrhea.

Immunodeficiency resembling human AIDS was reported in captive monkeys in the United States beginning in 1983.[6][7][8] SIV was isolated in 1985 from some of these animals, captive rhesus macaques suffering from simian AIDS (SAIDS).[7]

B Virus (herpes B, monkey B virus, herpesvirus simiae, and herpesvirus B)

B virus infection is caused by a herpes virus. B virus is also commonly referred to as herpes B, monkey B virus, herpesvirus simiae, and herpesvirus B.

The virus is found among macaque monkeys, including rhesus macaques, pig-tailed macaques, and cynomolgus monkeys (also called crab-eating or long-tailed macaques). Macaque monkeys are thought to be the natural host for the virus. Macaques infected with B virus usually have no or only mild symptoms. Macaques housed in primate facilities usually become B virus positive by the time they reach adulthood. However, infection in macaques can only be transmitted during active viral shedding through body fluids.

Infection with B virus is extremely rare in humans. When it does occur, the infection can result in severe brain damage or death if the patient is not treated soon after exposure (see Risks for Infection and Treatment sections). Infection in humans is typically caused by animal bites or scratches or by mucosal contact with body fluid or tissue.

Note:  Although B virus infection in humans is extremely rare, when it does occur, it is often fatal unless treated right away—about 70% of untreated patients die of complications associated with the infection

MOVIE TO WATCH:  THE CONSTANT GARDENER (NETFLIX DVD only)

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